Archive

August 17, 2012 — – Cristin Spotlighted in the New England National Public Radio

Cristin’s poetry & thoughts on poetry are featured in Jeremy Goodwin’s coverage of the Word X Word Festival on New England National Public Radio. To listen to the piece and/or read the article, please click here.

August 15, 2012 — – Cristin Interviewed in the Berkshire Eagle

In her Berkshire Eagle‘s article on the Word X Word Festival, writer Kate Abbott interviewed both Cristin & Write Bloody Publishing president Derrick Brown about the impact poetry in their lives, and the festival that hopes to introduce their poetry to the local Berkshire community. To read the full article click here.

April 9, 2012 — – Cristin Interviewed in Monkeybicycle

The indie lit journal Monkeybicyle interviewed Cristin about her second collection of poetry, Hot Teen Slut, on its popular blog. Indie lit’s own (and Mud Luscious founder) J.A. Tyler asked the questions, which covered topics like love vs. porn, poetry vs. fiction and life after smut-writing. He also wrote of the book that “porn has never been so poetically charged, never rendered with such humor and careful control, making Hot Teen Slut not only a fantastic book but a unique one in every sense of the word.” To read the full interview, please click here.

April 7, 2012 — – Cristin Interviewed in Stated Magazine

Professor, author & poetic raconteur Daniel Nester makes his debut as contributing editor of Stated Magazine with an interview with Cristin. The interview focuses on Cristin’s recently re-issued early work (“We would have to go to the world of records, where recording artist reissues and boxed sets are more common, with demos, alternate takes, non-album B-sides. I know I’m fetishizing these books as objects, but I’m a collector of sorts. That’s what I do.”), but spirals delightfully out of control with topics such as being an double agent in both performance & academics, why slammers love Billy Collins and how the concept of “Meet Internet Only Friends with Awkward Hugs” bridges the words of stage and page. To read the full article, click here.

March 30, 2012 — – Working Class Represent Reviewed in The Lit Pub

Cristin’s recently reissued third book of poetry, Working Class Represent (Write Bloody Publishing, 2011) enjoys an incredible review in the online lit blog, The Lit Pub. Reviewer David Cotrone writes, “I have heard that comedians are our modern philosophers. I have heard, too, that this is true of poets, the keepers of thought and inquiry, practitioners a sort of observation that could only belong to a writer. In Working Class Represent, Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz, however, transcends these categories — comedian and poet — as she is both. She surveys the way in which our lives may sometimes take sad and misshapen shapes, and creates these shapes anew while also keeping her good humor on display, showing that is possible to at once grimace, smile and even laugh….” He later writes “…Aptowicz’s strength is that she uses accessible language to say what no one else can. She navigates the world of labor and modernity with fierce conviction, all the while questioning all that lies before her. She writes of a familiar place — New York as we see it today — and yet under her lens the mundane becomes foreign, even wild. Yes, this book reveals our lives in motion, on the loose. Simply put, if the world is a question then Aptowicz has the answer. And luckily, like our greatest explorers, she has written it all down.” To read the full review, please click here.

January 2, 2012 — – Hot Teen Slut and Working Class Represent Reviewed in Specter Magazine

In their January 2012 issue, Specter Magazine published a joint review of Cristin’s second and third books of poetry, Hot Teen Slut and Working Class Represent (both Write Bloody Publishing, 2011). Reviewer Nidya Sarria writes that in the books, Cristin’s “observations ring with honesty, and I can’t help but think about female empowerment and humor and honesty and where this all ties together… She’s entertaining and frank and never once do I sense true hesitation on her part – if that’s not something to admire in a female writer, I don’t know what is.” To read the full review, please click here.